Friday Five

Cancer hopes, care homes and cleanliness – this week’s Friday Five

New test hope for prostate cancer

An experimental new urine test can reveal if men with early prostate cancer will probably need aggressive therapy or can be left untreated but monitored, which current tests cannot do.

The prostate urine risk (PUR) test looks for genetic markers to give a more accurate assessment.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in the UK, with 47,000 new cases a year.

Read more in BBC.

Eradication hope for cervical cancer

The success of the HPV vaccination offers hope of one day eradicating cervical cancer, say scientists who carried out a major review of evidence.

A Lancet review of 65 studies covering 60 million people showed a fall in HPV cases and in pre-cancerous growths.

Vaccination against the human papilloma virus, which causes most cervical cancers, began over a decade ago, and in the following decades, we should see a significant fall, and possible eradication, of the cancer.

Read more in the BBC.

A care home built a replica high street

A care home in Birmingham has built a “sensory street” – complete with tea room, sweet shop and post office – to help stimulate its residents, particularly those with dementia.

Read more in the BBC.

Being ‘too clean’ isn’t bad for health

The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) said the hygiene hypothesis – that allergies are caused by too much cleanliness, by killing off the bugs we need to challenge our immune systems – has entered the public imagination and is being misinterpreted.

Playing outside in the dirt will certainly do children good by exposing them to good bacteria, the RSPH stressed, but it was vital that they washed their hands before eating and after going to the toilet.

Read more in the HSJ.


Quote of the week

“[The NHS] is not getting the kind of support and indeed the kind of changes and management that it needs… It needs more money…  It needs reform”

Boris Johnson has been filmed at a private garden party telling Conservative members that the NHS absolutely needs to be reformed, as he fired them up for a general election.

Asked by one party member what he would do with the NHS, Johnson told the crowd the health service was a “crowning glory” but was “not getting the kind of support and indeed the kind of changes and management that it needs”, suggesting he as prime minister would aim to undertake an overhaul of the health service.

Read more in The Guardian.